For many, the recent global pandemic has shone a spotlight on how we treat our bodies, whether it’s because we smoke and drink, or because we eat too much and exercise too little. It has affected those that are lazy at home as well as those that like to be as athletic as possible. There are many precautions that can be taken to ensure your safety against possible infections, but many doctors remain adamant that one of the best things people can do right now is looking after themselves, which means finding ways of boosting our naturally built in immune systems.

Thankfully, this is a relatively easy thing to do and can even be done on a tight budget.

Fruit and Vegetables

The first place to start is diet, as our diet is what provides the fuel for our immunity to function on, and the type of fuel we give our bodies makes all the difference. A diet that’s rich in fatty meats, lots of sugar, alcohol, and unhealthy fats is more likely to cause disruptions in the immune system, making it weaker over time and increasing the chances of the body not being able to properly fight off any diseases.

Fruits and vegetables that are locally sourced tend to be a good place to start and having a wide a range as possible means more robust health. If possible, try and consume as beans at least every second day – or as often as most people like to play Ausbet games – as legumes are generally an excellent source of a huge range of minerals and vitamins. Soybeans are also a must, as they contain the complete set of amino acids that our bodies require to properly synthesize certain proteins and keep our cells in good health, as well as our immune systems.

Fibre

Getting at least 30 grams of raw fibre every single day should be a priority, and decent sources of fibre include whole grains, fruit, and leafy green vegetables. Fibre provides the fuel necessary to feed the good bacteria in the gut, which direct contributes positively to overall immune function. Body bacteria is often overlooked as unimportant, but scientists have found that bacteria make up more than half of the human body.

Garlic

Garlic is a delicious additive to any dish, but the bulbs also contain a special chemical known as allicin that’s extremely good for the immune system. Unfortunately, it’s also a chemical that can easily break down when exposed to heat, which means that cooking the garlic denatures the allicin present within. the best option is to consume it raw by cutting up a clove and adding it to a dish. Allicin has been proven to be a powerful weapon against any kind of infection and is a much-needed boost for any lacking immune system. Eating raw cloves whole is not recommended, as the chemical is only activated when the close is either cut up or chewed and chewing raw garlic can be shocking enough to cause intense sensation overload.